• Product Safety Standards & Regulations in Connecticut: An Overview

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    Product Safety Regulations Connecticut

    Selling products in Connecticut sometimes requires that you follow local product standards, substance restrictions, labeling, and documentation requirements. In this guide, we explain what you need to know about compliance requirements applicable to children’s products, food contact materials, jewelry, furniture, packaging, and more.

    Important: This article only serves as an introduction to safety requirements, substance restrictions, labeling, certification, and other compliance requirements in Connecticut. It is not a complete guide and is not kept up to date. Further, keep in mind that national product regulations (e.g. CPSIA) apply in all states.

    Act Concerning Banning Bisphenol-A in Children’s Products and Food Products

    Public Act No. 09-103 of Connecticut prohibits anyone from manufacturing, selling, offering for sale, or distributing any reusable food or beverage containers containing Bisphenol-A (BPA)

    Product Scope

    The requirements of this act apply to reusable food or beverage containers including, but not limited to the following:

    This act does not cover disposable food or beverage containers.

    Requirements

    Public Act No. 09-103 of Connecticut prohibits the manufacture, sale, offer to sale, or distribution of any reusable food or beverage containers containing Bisphenol-A.

    Lab Testing

    Manufacturers of reusable food or beverage containers should arrange BPA tests for their products prior to selling in Connecticut. Laboratories that offer BPA testing services include SGS, TÜV SÜD, and Intertek.

    Prohibition on Children’s Jewelry Containing Cadmium

    Section 21a-12d, General Statutes of Connecticut set a limit to the maximum allowable amount of cadmium in children’s jewelry to be 0.0075% by weight.

    Product Scope

    The requirement of this section applies to jewelry that is intended to be worn by children of 12 years old or younger, including the following items:

    • Charms
    • Bracelets
    • Pendants
    • Necklaces
    • Earrings
    • Rings
    • Brooches

    Requirements

    Section 21a-12d, General Statutes of Connecticut requires that no person shall manufacture, sell, offer to sell, or distribute in the State of Connecticut any children’s jewelry that contains an amount of cadmium higher than 0.0075% by weight.

    Lab Testing

    Manufacturers of jewelry that are intended to be used by children of or under 12 years old in Connecticut must test their products according to the cadmium requirements set by the General Statutes of Connecticut.

    Manufacture of Bedding and Upholstered Furniture

    Chapter 420a, Title 21a of Connecticut General Statutes, Manufacturer of Bedding and Upholstered Furniture establishes rules for registration, selling, sterilization, and labeling of the bedding and upholstered furniture in Connecticut.

    Product Scope

    The requirements of this section apply to bedding and upholstered furniture containing filling materials and are intended to be used for sleeping, resting, sitting, or reclining. Such products include but are not limited to the following:

    • Mattress
    • Pillows
    • Cushions
    • Quilts
    • Bed pads
    • Comforters
    • Sleeping bags
    • Upholstered spring beds
    • Box springs
    • Davenports
    • Couches
    • Hammock pillows

    Requirements

    Chapter 420a requires that every manufacturer, Importer, or supply dealer of bedding and upholstered furniture must register with the Department of Consumer Protection and obtain a sales license before being allowed to sell in Connecticut. This license should be posted in the place of business of the license owner. The period of validity of this license is one year.

    Labeling

    Chapter 420a requires that every bedding or upholstered furniture offered for sale should be attached to it a tag contains the following information:

    • The name of the filling material(s)
    • A description of whether the filling material is new or secondhand
    • License number
    • The name and address of the manufacturer or supply dealer
    • The percentage by weight of each filling material

    If the filling materials are secondhand, the tag should include the words “contents sterilized” and the permit number of the sterilizer.

    Lab Testing

    Manufacturers or dealers of bedding or upholstered furniture must properly label their products. The filling materials should be indicated on each label in percentage by weight in descending order. If not sure the percentage, manufacturers or dealers should test their products in a lab agency that is capable of providing such service.

    Mercury Reduction and Education

    The Connecticut Chapter 446m, Mercury Reduction and Education establish rules on the manufacturer, use, sales, and distribution of certain mercury-added products.

    Product Scope

    The chapter covers products such as:

    • Mercury-added novelties
    • Fever thermometers
    • Dairy manometers
    • Mercury button cell batteries

    Requirements

    The chapter prohibits the sales and distribution of mercury-added products we introduce below.

    Ban on mercury-added novelty

    This chapter prohibits anyone from offering for sale or distributing any mercury-added novelties. A “mercury-added novelty” is defined as a mercury-added product intended mainly for personal or household enjoyment or adornment, including, but not limited to:

    • Footwear
    • Candles
    • Toys
    • Apparel
    • Figurines
    • Adornments
    • Games
    • Cards
    • Ornaments
    • Yard statues
    • Figures
    • Jewelry
    • Holiday decorations
    • Products intended for use as practical jokes

    A product that includes a removable mercury button cell battery is not counted as a mercury-added novelty.

    Manufacturers that produce or sell mercury-added novelties in Connecticut should notify retailers about the ban and provide them with instructions on how to dispose of the inventory.

    Ban on mercury fever thermometers

    The chapter prohibits anyone from offering for sale or distributing for promotional purposes mercury fever thermometers, excluding if prescribed by a physician.

    Manufacturers of mercury fever thermometers shall provide the retailers, wholesalers, or other buyers the following information:

    • Mercury content of the thermometers
    • Instructions on proper disposal
    • Methods on how to avoid breaking the item
    • Methods to proper cleanup when breakage occurs

    Ban on mercury dairy manometers

    The chapter prohibits anyone from offering for sale or distributing for promotional purposes mercury dairy manometers. Manufacturers of mercury dairy manometers should notify retailers of the ban and provide instructions on how to dispose of the inventory properly to avoid pollution.

    Lab Testing

    Manufacturers of products covered by this act should test whether their products contain any content of mercury before selling in Connecticut.

    Act Concerning the Use of Perfluoroalkyl or Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) in Class B Firefighting Foam

    Public Act No. 21-191 prohibits manufacturers from intentionally adding PFAS to Class B firefighting foam and food packaging.

    Product Scope

    Public Act No. 21-191 covers food packaging or packaging components that are intended to come in direct contact with any food or beverage. Examples of such food packaging include:

    • Sandwich wrappers
    • French-fry boxes
    • Deli paper
    • Take-out containers
    • Single-use plates
    • Food trays
    • Baking supplies

    Requirements

    The act is to repeal the currently executed regulation on food packaging materials, which restricts the concentration level of 6 types of heavy metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, or hexavalent chromium).

    The new act prohibits manufacturers from intentionally adding PFAS into food packaging, or its components, and Class B firefighting foam. It also prohibits manufacturers of food packaging from replacing the materials with equal or greater hazards compared to the currently specific metals.

    Lab Testing

    Importers or sellers of food packaging should make sure that their products do not contain intentionally added PFAS. To confirm, simply contact laboratories that are capable of conducting PFAS trace tests.

    Product Liability Laws

    The Product Liability Laws in Connecticut allow consumers to file a claim against the companies based on the legal principles of negligence, strict liability, and breach of warranty. Manufacturers of consumer products are responsible to keep the products safe for consumers to use from the following or other relevant aspects:

    • Manufacture
    • Construction
    • Design
    • Formula
    • Preparation
    • Assembly
    • Installation
    • Testing
    • Warnings
    • Instructions
    • Marketing
    • Packaging
    • Labeling

    Product Scope

    The Product Liability Laws in Connecticut apply to products that are intended to be used by consumers, including:

    • Children’s products
    • Toys
    • Apparel and textiles
    • Footwear
    • Electronic and electrical products

    Requirements

    The laws allow for claims based on negligence, strict liability, and breach of warranty. A claimant has the right to sue a product manufacturer for his or her injury or loss due to the:

    a. Design defect (i.e. the manufacturer failed to design or manufacturer the product in a proper way to avoid the unreasonable risk of threat or harm to the users)

    b. Manufacturing defect (i.e. manufacturer using substandard materials; fail to monitor the manufacturing process; fail to train the workers properly; or fail to conduct a quality inspection after finishing production)

    c. Marketing/warning defects (i.e. the product has insufficient warning labels or instructions for proper and safe use)

    Labeling

    Under the Product Liability Laws of Connecticut, manufacturers are responsible to provide sufficient warning information or instructions so that consumers use the products properly and safely.

    Lab Testing

    Manufacturers are responsible for ensuring the safety of the products in every facet, including designing, materials, structure, assembly, and others. Therefore, they should consult an experienced laboratory to find out about relevant lab tests.

    Learn More

    Regulation Website
    Act Concerning Banning Bisphenol-A in Children’s Products and Food Products Link
    Prohibition on Children’s Jewelry Containing Cadmium Link
    Manufacture of Bedding and Upholstered Furniture Link
    Mercury Reduction and Education Link
    Act Concerning the Use of Perfluoroalkyl or Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) in Class B Firefighting Foam Link
    Product Liability Laws Link
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    Disclaimer: The content on this website is provided for general information only. The content includes summaries written by our team members based on publicly available information about product safety standards, labeling, documentation, testing, processes, and other product compliance related topics. However, we don’t guarantee that we cover every single relevant regulation/standard/requirement, or that the information is free from errors, or covering every single scenario and exemption. We do make mistakes from time to time. We never provide legal advice of any sort.

    Changes/Updates: Product standards and substance restrictions are subject to frequent updates and changes. In addition, new regulations, standards, and/or requirements may also become effective at any time. We don’t update our articles whenever new standards/regulations/rules are added or changed. We recommend that you consult a lab testing company or other professional to get the latest information about mandatory standards/regulations in your market, country, or state. Lab testing companies generally stay up to date on new and updated standards and regulations.

    National/State-Level Standards/Regulations: Many articles don't cover all European national and US state standards, regulations, and requirements. We recommend that you consult a testing company or other professional to confirm all relevant (and current) national/state level standards and regulations.
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